where-to-invade-next

A Must Watch: Where To Invade Next

Michael Moore is always stirring some political pot. At times he’s not the most liked in his home soil of the United States, but one fact you can’t deny is Michael Moore, love him or hate him, doesn’t mind controversy in the search of truth. Yes he bias, what producer isn’t? Every movie of his you must watch understanding that there’s a hidden bias or else you’re going to take his movies too seriously (Sicko, Capitalism: A Love Story, Fahrenheit 9/11, Bowling for Columbine).

Enter: Where To Invade Next?

This is my favourite Michael Moore movie yet. It has nothing to do with war (though the title seems to make you think so). He visits various countries in Europe and talks to them about Government, Tax, Education, Health Care, Judicial system, food and much more.

Enlightening is an understatement.

Every place he visits seems to be beautiful, friendly people who work great jobs for great wages and have a very important family life. In some places the kids are never assigned homework because social connection and family time is so important to the education system. Two hour lunches with your family, 36 hour work weeks and lots of vacation time. Hard to argue with that!

One of my favourite parts was when Mr. Moore was talking to teachers in Finland (one of the best regarded countries for education worldwide) he asked “what’s the one thing you would tell me to take back and spread across the USA?”. Almost in unison they all said “get rid of the standardized test!” Hard to argue with some of the best teachers in the world.

The Documentary is on Netflix right now and I think you should watch it.

Your Privacy vs Being Accessible

Eric Schmidt quote on privacy

The new world is I’m Googling you the second you email me. I’m going to find everything I can about you. Google can find almost anything these days. I should be able to search your name and contact information and find all relevant information about you. I mean it’s 2014, you have to assume everyone is going to Google you at some point, right?

Now the privacy pundits will tell you to stay as anonymous as you can, as Lloyd Christmas once said, “lot of bad drivers out there!”. But REALLY, really?  How many people do you know who have been stalked?  Is that even still a thing?  We’re too concerned about privacy that we’re losing out on business opportunity.

I had a meeting booked with an organization, the night before the meeting I search the person I was meeting with on Google (I do this with a lot of people surprisingly) the only site other than LinkedIn said she was in Swift Current not Regina. I sent an email asking about her whereabouts, I receive nothing in return. I Googled the organization to find a phone number but there’ only a Regina contact. The “Contact Us” page had a form to fill out, no numbers. Finally I search for her email because for sure her phone number would be in the salutation at the bottom of the email right?  Wrong.

It was 30 minutes till a meeting with someone in another city that I had no number for, what would you do?

I didn’t make the meeting.

The lady called, she was upset. I didn’t mention the difficult time trying to find her contact info let alone a phone number. She didn’t want to hear what I had to say, her mind was made up.

I hate offending people. I don’t like upsetting people. I really try hard never to miss a meeting. By that time I think it was for the best. To help someone with social media when they won’t as much as publish a phone number is relatively impossible.

Answer the new phone. Be accessible, especially your workplace. Nothing says we hate our customers like not being able to find a phone number to call.

Google yourself. Google your company. Google your company name and “contact info”. See what comes up. If it isn’t exactly what your customers want then change it.

Oh yeah, how your customers find information about you will change, it will always change, it’s in your best interest to ask them periodically if you’re still providing information where it is most easily accessible.

It’s The Unexpected Things We (Consumers) Remember

Quicklane Regina, Regina oil changes I’ve needed windshield washer fluid for almost a month. Well not really “needed” per se, every now and then when I slammed on the brakes the windshield washer fluid light would come on. So during winter I probably had a couple months left in her.  Any who. Read more

If You’re Going To Do Billboards Remember This…

TheWeddingFair.ca billboard

Make your message bloody specific.

If outdoor billboards are part of your marketing mix take a lesson from TheWeddingFair.ca. I saw this in Calgary the other day. The most prominent part of the billboard is exactly what they want you to remember. Their website.

They respect your time by not trying to tell you everything about the event.  If you don’t bombard people with information, they like that, weird hey? The simplicity of the billboard makes it stand out on a busy street. You could argue the billboard is not only simple but also unexpected if you’re talking about Chip and Dan Heath’s book Made to Stick six principles of sticky ideas.

If you’re advertising, make it incredibly clear what your goal is. Obviously the website is the most valuable piece of information to take away from this billboard.  From there you can look up anything you would like to know about the event.

Don’t make the classic mistake of trying to include more information than you have to. This goes for ANY of your marketing material. You should always ask before you publish/print “does all this information really need to be on here?” the more critical you are the better the end product will be.

Good on you TheWeddingFair.ca

Do People Write Reviews About Your Business? They Will…

I went on my Kindle the other day to buy the book “Neuromarketing”, I had heard about it in a podcast.  When I searched, I found it, but I also found a similar book.  A similar book with a perfect 5 star rating.

Neuromarketing book search Read more

Casestudy: How a Babyboomer Buys a Vehicle

Capital GMC website's homepageMy Father is a baby boomer, he has no brand preference to vehicle (see next sentence) and he loves his cars.  In the past ten years my he has driven a Nissan, Infinity, Honda, BMW and recently he went out to find a truck.  Read more