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What I Learned While Going on a Ride Along With The Regina Police

1.  They’re not just out to give tickets, they’re trying to keep Regina safe.  My initial impression of “Cops” per se was that of the stereotypical Farva off Super Troopers.  Rod-FarvaYou know what I mean, just complete jerk-faces? (Yes you hyphenate jerk-faces)  Yeah, they’re nothing like that at all.  I met a few while I was in the back for debriefing and they were down to earth normal people.  And no they don’t try to give you tickets, if you break the law in front of them they’re going to give you a ticket.  A few bad eggs hurts their reputation that’s for sure.

2.  They have a very, very difficult job.  A lot of the people they deal with have no respect for Cops whatsoever, you can imagine how their interactions usually go.  Any time you have an exchange with a Police Officer it’s usually because of something bad happened.  They’re the bringers of bad news.  It’s incredibly difficult to imagine that in your day-to-day most people you deal with are not happy with you at all, it must affect their mood and attitude over time. Read more

Where Do You Volunteer?

At Folkfest in Regina this past weekend I saw two girls a friend had recently hired to work for his company.  They were volunteering.

That struck me a mildly awesome.  There’s a 85%* chance that those girls are younger than you and they took it upon themselves to volunteer at Folkfest.

I told my friend about it and we agreed that that is a very positive attribute to possess, a willingness to volunteer.  It shows you care, that you’re not selfish (or a shellfish), that you believe in giving back, that you support local events/causes/entities that need your help.

How do you give back?

 

* – based on an estimated guess of the average age of my readers, 85% of them would be older than the girls mentioned above.

What To Do About Your Fear of Writing

Terrified of writing?  Most people are, that’s why it’s always good to remind yourself of why you go through with the arduous task of attempting to create masterpieces regularly.  I found this wonderfully inspiring quote on the fear of writing on Reddit.com, written by none other than Ira Glass himself.  Yes, the Ira Glass, you know the one who hosts Public Radio International’s This American Life podcast.  The podcast that has 1.7 million listeners.  He’s easily one of the best story tellers of our generation.  You must read this:

You need to write. That’s the only thing that will make your writing better. You’re afraid to write something that’s shit, that dishonors. But even Hemingway said, “The first draft of anything is shit.” It’s just a starting point. You have to get something down in the rough before you can perfect it.

Stories about your ancestors are what you should write. They engage your feelings because they mean something to you. You need to be emotionally engaged in your story. If you write about things that you don’t feel about, you won’t care about the material, and it will be gray, flat, and lifeless.

So start. Once you get your first draft, go back through and polish. Do it until you’re happy with it. Walt Whitman, the famous poet, started writing Leaves of Grass at 37, and kept rewriting it to perfect it until he died at the age of 72. You don’t have to publish it. You can keep it secret, and polish it until it shines with its own light.

But you have to get it on paper first. Here’s what will happen: You will write, and a lot of it will be shit, and you will worry that you’ll get run over a bus and someone will find it and know what a hack you are. But you ignore that inner perfectionist, because it’ll keep you rewriting the first paragraph until it’s perfect and you’ll never get anywhere. You keep going until its done. You write the whole thing. And then, when you’re finished, you read it.

You won’t be happy with it. You’ll cringe over the awkward sentences, the poor transitions, the pacing, blah blah blah. But you’ll find these moments of beauty captured in words, like poetry, alive and breathing. And you’ll move back a paragraph and build to that moment, and then the page will come alive, and you’ll feel the rhythm of the words and how their energy leads into the next moment. And you’ll struggle with the turn of a phrase that’s not just right until, with a twist here and a tweak there, you realize you’ve captured one of life’s secrets on the page, and you’ll glory in it. You keep going like that. And every time you do, you’ll feel your ancestors smile.

This is the way it’s done. This is the way that it’s always been done. Read more

The Great Global Warming Swindle

We’ve all watched Al Gore’s An Inconvenient Truth and were inspired to begin worrying about what we we’re doing to the planet.  Here’s the flip side, the side that the environmentalists don’t want you to see.  It’s called The Great Global Warming Swindle.  I found it to be enlightening.  I’ll let you watch and form your own opinion.

Talks a lot about the documentary here as well

What’s Your Zero Moment of Truth?

zmotI think anyone who’s future depends upon the internet or some form of it must read Winning The Zero Moment of Truth (ZMOT). And it’s really easy to get your hands on because you can download it for free here:

Winning the Zero Moment of Truth by Jim Lecinski Read more

Never Ever Say “I Should Have…”

Many people throughout their life will make a rendition of the statement “I should have done that!” or “I should have invented that!” or “I should have went to that!”.  Stop it.  You didn’t, so don’t dwell on the past and what you didn’t do.  It’s not very productive to analyze what you didn’t do and telling others that “you should have” makes people think you’re not very good at making decisions.

How does the saying go?  Very few people on their death beds say they wish they didn’t do so much throughout their life.  Inevitably when we’re old we will regret the things we didn’t do.

If you haven’t watched “Yes Man” yet, watch it, and seriously consider taking on a ‘Yes Man’ philosophy.