Growth Hacker Marketing

Traditional Marketing is Dead: Long Live Growth Hacker Marketing

Marketing is dead!

Marketing as you know is done. It’s over. We can move on now. The powers of the traditional campaigns, press releases, air time, 30 second spots, distribution lists, the bloody Yellow pages,  and I could go on and on. Its all dead. No one needs to be told what to buy, we Google it. 

What do you do in a world where everyone has access to enormous amounts of information?

You figure out a way to use that to your advantage obviously. What Ryan Holiday does is look at trends, finds curves and tends to fling himself with no holds bar into the edge of business. He’s on the forefront of communication strategy, I mean he could teach several classes at Harvard on advertising, marketing, consumer behaviour, social psychology, just name a few.

There’s something new afoot! Growth Hacker Marketing the term coined in 2010 in an article by Sean Ellis talking about startups and their unique business savy and avoidance of traditional marketing means.

Out of necessity a new a new type of marketing is born, welcome Growth Hacker Marketing

Testable, trackable and scaleable.

The pursuit of sustainable growth. Taking a company from nothing to something.

Under the news laws of the universe (mostly because of the Internet) you can’t use traditional means to get your “brand” out there. At this point you may not have a clue as to what your brand is anymore! Hint: you don’t control it whatsoever. No, growth hacking has everything to do with exponentially growing your organization far past where you ever thought possible. Here it is…

Growth Hacker Marketing

Growth Hacker Marketing

  1. Product market fit
  2. Finding your growth hack
  3. Going viral: turn 1 into 2, 2 into 4 and so on
  4. Close the loop: retention and optimization

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A Summer Camp For Highschool Entrepreneurs in Regina

Bigideacamp website

Yup, we did it! The first week of August this past Summer we ran “Big Idea Camp 2015” a one day, Amazing race meets Harvard business competition. We had 6 students who formed two teams and competed in 5 different challenges throughout the day. It was nothing short of amazing.

Here’s the Twitter play by play on the day… Remember to follow @BigIdeaCamp on Twitter!

Big idea camp on twitter

Social Media Etiquette 101: how not to suck on Facebook

This is how i feel when you like your own posts

Last week we release episode 22 of the #InTheLab video series.

Social Media Etiquette, or what I call How Not To Suck On Facebook“. Each social media platform has a set of unwritten rules you need to follow. Every time you break the rules you are apt to have followers leave you, online masses upset with you, and you may even piss off one of your loved ones. Don’t make the silly mistake, watch the video and get the tips for yourself.

Do you follow me You should

Stop broadcasting, stop interrupting, stop worrying about what you’re sharing and be a good community member. Amplify the good, help people spread their message. Then when it comes time that you need some help spreading your message your tribe will be there to help.

How not to suck on facebook

 

How To Get People To Not Share Their Ideas With You

(dont)Poke the bear

Tell them they’re wrong. Tell them you have a better idea. Back up your idea with some made up evidence based on opinion. Make sure they know you’re smarter about whatever topic you’re talking about. That’ll work! That person will never want to share an idea with you again.

Every time you shut down someone’s idea it’s like poking a bear. Sure you can get away with it the first time and maybe the second, but sooner or later if you keep poking, the bear is going to eat you.

Don’t strive to be “right” in conversations, that’s your ego coming through. Be confident in yourself, so confident in fact that you let others be right. Then more and more you’ll find others wanting to share their ideas with you.

The Paradox of Your Target Market

idea-diffusion-curve

The larger your target market the more customers you can service and a better chance to make a lot of money. Service a large number of people and you’re sure to be a success, you don’t want to leave anyone out or exclude anyone do you?  Create a product that the average person would like.  You’re sure to make a lot of sales selling an average product to average people, right?

(targeting the early and late majority is the largest, most profitable chunk of the curve but they are a difficult group to market to, for the most part they follow what the innovators and early adopters are doing.  As well you have much more competition in the early and late majority)

Or

Pick the smallest possible niche you could possibly target and focus on them and them only.  Relentlessly seek feedback from your best customers and constantly figure out new ways to delight them.  If you consistently exceed expectations they will have to talk about you to others.  Never worry about the people who aren’t in your target market, you must exclude others to allow yourself time to treat the select few customers you do want to work with extra special.  Inevitably people will be offended, upset, and even pissed off at what you do, this is a sure sign you’re on to something.

(targeting the innovators of your target market is difficult but if done properly, very profitable.  Remember, the late majority follows the early majority, the early majority follows the early adopters, and the early adopters follow what the innovators do.  Focus your efforts on the innovators and over time it will be exponentially)

You can only pick one strategy, choose wisely.

 

What Will Inevitably Happen To Your Business…

This will inevitably happen to your business, start preparing now.

Competition increases.  Growth stops, your business begins to flat line.  The CEO sends the marching orders “we need more sales!  Send out more newsletters, lets get on the Radio, lets have a sale this weekend, lets start advertising in the Sunday post AND Metro.”  To the CEO’s surprise, nothing changes.  No one opens his “more frequent” newsletter.  We tune out his quirky but generic radio spot.  And anyone who’s reading Metro, Fine LifeStyles, Business Magazine, The Sunday post, won’t be next week when the newest magazine or newspaper gets our attention. Read more