The Two Things Every Leader Of A Nonprofit Must Have

Dr Seuss QuotesA vision and they must care, a lot.

I’ve worked with many Nonprofits,  as well as volunteered on several boards (currently president of one and vice president of another). I’ve seen the good and the bad, the purpose driven and the lost souls.

One day going back and forth with a good friend discussing the growth strategy of Nonprofit organizations she pitches me, “if you want to run a successful Nonprofit the person in charge has to have a vision of what they want to create and they must care a whole lot.” This struck me as odd because how could something so complex as the leadership of a Nonprofits be summed up by satisfying two variables? It couldn’t possibly be that simple could it?

This moment in time reminded me of a Woody Guthrie quote.

“Any fool can make something complicated. It takes a genius to make it simple.”

Nonprofit leadership comes down to two things. Having a vision and caring. A leader with an inspirational vision but doesn’t care is a snake oil salesman. They have grandiose ideas, they’re smooth talkers, they could sell a Ketchup Popsicle to a women in white gloves. But when the chips fall, when the going get tough, when the real work begins, this snake oil slinging fella is nowhere to be found. Read more

How Risk-Averse Entrepreneurs Succeed

Timothy Ferriss

Learning  relearning how to start a business is something we all need to remind ourselves about from time to time. You only fail when you think you get “it”.

Here’s a video that Timothy Ferriss put on his blog. An interview with another entrepreneur (Noah Kagan of App Sumo). But not just an interview these two go back and forth on how to start a new venture, what questions to ask, how to test early as possible, how to call your own bullshit, and how to begin with the customer.

They even take an audience member and help him create a business. Literally, he pivots during the interview and they actually begin taking orders for this “new product” on air. Ridiculous!

Watch it…

The Paradox of Your Target Market

idea-diffusion-curve

The larger your target market the more customers you can service and a better chance to make a lot of money. Service a large number of people and you’re sure to be a success, you don’t want to leave anyone out or exclude anyone do you?  Create a product that the average person would like.  You’re sure to make a lot of sales selling an average product to average people, right?

(targeting the early and late majority is the largest, most profitable chunk of the curve but they are a difficult group to market to, for the most part they follow what the innovators and early adopters are doing.  As well you have much more competition in the early and late majority)

Or

Pick the smallest possible niche you could possibly target and focus on them and them only.  Relentlessly seek feedback from your best customers and constantly figure out new ways to delight them.  If you consistently exceed expectations they will have to talk about you to others.  Never worry about the people who aren’t in your target market, you must exclude others to allow yourself time to treat the select few customers you do want to work with extra special.  Inevitably people will be offended, upset, and even pissed off at what you do, this is a sure sign you’re on to something.

(targeting the innovators of your target market is difficult but if done properly, very profitable.  Remember, the late majority follows the early majority, the early majority follows the early adopters, and the early adopters follow what the innovators do.  Focus your efforts on the innovators and over time it will be exponentially)

You can only pick one strategy, choose wisely.

 

No One Expects Special Treament

That’s why when you receive special treatment and your expectations are blown away, it stands out your mind and you’re apt to be more loyal to who ever treated you this way.

We were at a restaurant last night, being as loud as we usually are on a Saturday night.  We received two warnings to quiet down from the manager of the establishment.  Our reaction?  We paid our bill and went to Earls instead for the remainder of the night.

We go to Earls a lot because of the way they treat us.  We’ve never been given a warning (even though we’re almost always the loudest table there), they know most of us by name, and make an effort to do more than just serve us.  Even though that’s all their job is, just to serve you food and drinks.  If all they did was “just” serve food and drinks then Earls wouldn’t be such a popular establishment in Regina.

This isn’t a post about how great Earls is, it’s about how you treat your customers and if you’re consistently making an effort to exceed expectations.

After all…

No one expects to be treated special, but if you empower your employees and management to go above and beyond the regular level of service, you’re going to create a much different atmosphere.

Do People Write Reviews About Your Business? They Will…

I went on my Kindle the other day to buy the book “Neuromarketing”, I had heard about it in a podcast.  When I searched, I found it, but I also found a similar book.  A similar book with a perfect 5 star rating.

Neuromarketing book search Read more

What Will Inevitably Happen To Your Business…

This will inevitably happen to your business, start preparing now.

Competition increases.  Growth stops, your business begins to flat line.  The CEO sends the marching orders “we need more sales!  Send out more newsletters, lets get on the Radio, lets have a sale this weekend, lets start advertising in the Sunday post AND Metro.”  To the CEO’s surprise, nothing changes.  No one opens his “more frequent” newsletter.  We tune out his quirky but generic radio spot.  And anyone who’s reading Metro, Fine LifeStyles, Business Magazine, The Sunday post, won’t be next week when the newest magazine or newspaper gets our attention. Read more