Stop Blaming Other People

I'm sorryWhen you blame someone else for something, no matter what it is, you’re protecting yourself from being wrong or at fault.

When you say you’re sorry and take ownership of the situation, the common misconception is that it makes you look weak or powerless. When actually, saying you’re sorry humanizes you and makes you more likeable.

It’s easy to blame others, it’s hard to blame ourselves.

Understanding this is imperative to you making it in this world. It’s a scary place out there and you need to have thick skin if you want to make it. You have to own up to your mistakes. Take responsibility for when things go wrong, don’t point out where others messed up, shut up and fix it yourself. If you get the reputation as the person who takes responsibility, who gets things done, and isn’t afraid of being wrong, you’re grooming yourself to be a leader.

When you blame others for something, it gives you nothing to do about it. Once you blame yourself, you now have something to work on. In the book Bounce it talks about how world class athletes sometimes feel lost when they win, because they have nothing they need to work on. The most successful athletes in the world are the ones constantly working to make something better.

Get in the habit of taking the blame, point the finger at yourself and don’t being afraid to fix a situation. People look up to others who get shit done. Especially in the world we live in, we all need to strive to take the blame more often.

It starts by not blaming others.

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4 Lessons About Business You Can Learn From Snowboarding

How far will you go?

1. No one is instantly good at business or snowboarding.

Snowboarding takes a while to get the hang of, just like business. No one wakes up a brilliant business person or gnarly snowboarder. Both take time. Those that get better are the ones who keep pushing the limits, they never assume they’ve hit their peak, they seek out unchartered territory, they try new things. They keep falling and falling but never refuse to stay down, that’s the key to success in snowboarding and business. Continue reading »

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The Two Things Every Leader Of A Nonprofit Must Have

Dr Seuss QuotesA vision and they must care, a lot.

I’ve worked with many Nonprofits,  as well as volunteered on several boards (currently president of one and vice president of another). I’ve seen the good and the bad, the purpose driven and the lost souls.

One day going back and forth with a good friend discussing the growth strategy of Nonprofit organizations she pitches me, “if you want to run a successful Nonprofit the person in charge has to have a vision of what they want to create and they must care a whole lot.” This struck me as odd because how could something so complex as the leadership of a Nonprofits be summed up by satisfying two variables? It couldn’t possibly be that simple could it?

This moment in time reminded me of a Woody Guthrie quote.

“Any fool can make something complicated. It takes a genius to make it simple.”

Nonprofit leadership comes down to two things. Having a vision and caring. A leader with an inspirational vision but doesn’t care is a snake oil salesman. They have grandiose ideas, they’re smooth talkers, they could sell a Ketchup Popsicle to a women in white gloves. But when the chips fall, when the going get tough, when the real work begins, this snake oil slinging fella is nowhere to be found. Continue reading »

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Why I Think My Sister Is Brilliant

Amy and MeI had an enlightening conversation with my sister the other day. She works for a company in Calgary. She really understands the industry (realizing this after many probing questions of course) she’s worked her way up to a point where she’s quite valuable in the company, and she still doesn’t know how smart she is.

She isn’t lazy, hates being board, and understands that a stressful, hectic, growing company is much better to be working for than a stale, easy to do job, at a company going no where. The way she thinks is simply refreshing. A great person to have on the team. She truly wants to see her company grow and has a pretty good handle on how to go about doing that.

The best part? She doesn’t have a University degree. Nor do I think she needs one, I think she’s brilliant.

School was never her thing, so she couldn’t pay attention in class and learn, just like many kids back in the day and even more so today. She probably would be diagnosed with a mild version of attention deficit hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). But she’s so intelligent in how she thinks. She understands how actions affect other people, she’s self-aware, and really has the companies best interests in mind.

She’s a women in a industry dominated by men, has been told but popular education that her grades just aren’t good enough and still she’s excelling at her job in an enormous way. That’s awesome.

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How Risk-Averse Entrepreneurs Succeed

Timothy Ferriss

Learning  relearning how to start a business is something we all need to remind ourselves about from time to time. You only fail when you think you get “it”.

Here’s a video that Timothy Ferriss put on his blog. An interview with another entrepreneur (Noah Kagan of App Sumo). But not just an interview these two go back and forth on how to start a new venture, what questions to ask, how to test early as possible, how to call your own bullshit, and how to begin with the customer.

They even take an audience member and help him create a business. Literally, he pivots during the interview and they actually begin taking orders for this “new product” on air. Ridiculous!

Watch it…

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Are Newspapers Dying?

WhoKilledTheNewspaper-The Economist

Are Newspapers Dying?

Warren Buffet doesn’t seem to think so, buying up some 60 odd papers in the past two years. He’s not alone either, other billionaires as of late have been splurging on traditional print media companies like Takeru Kobayashi at a hotdog eating contest.

So the obvious question is, why?

Buffett thinks it has to do with a monopoly on local news. People will always need their news, off or online. As long as local Newspapers can focus on the local news he think they’ll be just fine.

Amazon’s founder, Jeff Bezos’ just purchased the Washington Post for $250 million. From Fastcompany: “Observers were surprised when the Amazon Chief purchased the prestigious-and ailing-Washington institution, but history shows that sometimes buying a media property is like buying a boat.”

So now rich people to show off, instead of buying a yacht, mansion or real estate, they’re buying newspapers.

The Boston Globe was sold to John Henry, owner of the Boston Redsox for $70 million. If you think that’s a lot, to put it into perspective, the New York Times Co. purchased the Boston Globe in 1993 for $1.1 billion. The return on that investment is breathtakingly horrible.

And a little closer to home, the Leaderpost, as of May 14th along with many other of Post Media’s entities have gone  subscription fee after you’ve read your 10th article for free. I’d be curious to see the numbers of people subscribing to the online Leaderpost, again, I don’t necessarily think the Leaderpost is in trouble. People need their news. And people want to trust the source for their local news. I can see the Leaderpost online entity being a very value online publication for little ol booming Regina. As Warren Buffett says, “as long as they stick to delivering local news that readers can’t find anywhere else.”

It’s going to be a rocky road ahead for the Leaderpost, Washington Post, and Boston Globe, Google is set to make more revenue than the entire U.S. print industry combined.

Google Rakes In More Ad Dollars than All Print Media

Image Source: Google Rakes In More Ad Dollars Than U.S. Print Media

Looking at this graph it’s hard not to think Newspapers could be dying faster than we think, that’s trusting that this graph is 100% true as well. ;)

What do you think? Will Newspapers disappear? How would you go about saving them?

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